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Working in Sweden

Here, you can read about what applies if you work in Sweden and live in a different country.

You are normally insured in Sweden if you work here. This applies even if you live in another country within the EU/EEA or in Switzerland. Being insured in Sweden means that you may be entitled to different types of compensation from Försäkringskassan, such as child allowance and sickness benefit.

You may also be entitled to a Swedish European Health Insurance Card and care in your home country through a certificate for registering for medical care, certificate E106 (S1). You are only entitled to the certificate if the equivalent of Försäkringskassan in the country where you live determines that you are a resident there. Apply using the form.

5435 Application for European Health Insurance Card, certificate E106, E109, E121, S1 or Certificate on the right to care in Sweden if you live outside of Sweden (105 kB)PDF opens in a new window

If you need medical care in Sweden

If you work in Sweden but live in another EU/EEA country or in Switzerland, you may be entitled to medical care in Sweden. To receive this, you need a certificate from Försäkringskassan. This only applies to medical care in the public healthcare system and at the standard Swedish patient fee.

Your family may be entitled to medical care

Your family members who do not work i your home country may also be entitled to medical care at the standard patient fee both in your home country and in Sweden when you work in Sweden. Contact the equivalent of Försäkringskassan in your home country to ensure your family members are entitled to care.

If you move to Sweden

If you are planning on staying in Sweden at least one year, you must generally be entered into the Swedish population register. This applies whether you are working or doing something else. You do this by registering with the Swedish Tax Agency. 

When you live in Sweden, you may be entitled to different types of compensation from Försäkringskassan, such as child allowance and housing allowance. You are also entitled to medical care and dental care under the same terms as other residents. 

 

If you are working in Sweden for an employer from another EU/EEA country or Switzerland, you are normally insured in the country in which you are employed. From that country, you or your employer must apply for certificate A1. The certificate indicates in which country you are insured and in which country you and your employer must pay social security fees. To receive the care you need, you must be able to present a certificate for registering for medical care, certificate E106 (S1). Contact the equivalent of Försäkringskassan in your home country to obtain the certificates.

For be able to receive medical and dental care

When you travel in the EU/EEA or Switzerland, you must have a European Health Insurance Card. You obtain this from the country in which you are employed. You are entitled to medical care and dental care once your E106 certificate has been registered. To do this, you need a certificate from Försäkringskassan. This only applies to medical care in the public healthcare system and at the standard Swedish patient fee.

Once you have received the E106 or S1 certificate, you must send it in to Försäkringskassan together with the following form.

Do not forget to report your move to Sweden to the Swedish Tax Agency. They will want a copy of the E106 or S1.

 

If you work in Sweden but live in a different Nordic country and need care, you must present the “Certificate on the right to care benefits in Sweden”. You apply for the certificate by submitting the form

5435 Application for European Health Insurance Card, certificate E106, E109, E121, S1 or Certificate on the right to care in Sweden if you live outside of Sweden (105 kB)PDF opens in a new window

If you move to Sweden

If you are planning on staying in Sweden at least one year, you must generally be entered into the Swedish population register. This applies whether you are working or doing something else. You do this by registering with the Swedish Tax Agency. 

When you live in Sweden, you may be entitled to different types of compensation from Försäkringskassan, such as child allowance and housing allowance. You are also entitled to medical care and dental care under the same terms as other residents.

 

If you will be working in several countries within the EU/EEA or in Switzerland, you must report this to the equivalent of Försäkringskassan in your country of residence.

If you live in Sweden, you must report this to Försäkringskassan. You must fill in the form to let us determine in which country you are insured. Once we have determined this, you will receive certificate A1. You can then apply for a certificate for registering  medical care, certificate E106. The certificate gives you the right to care in your country of residence and in Sweden. If also gives you the right to a Swedish European Health Insurance Card.

6220 Request for A1/E101 certificate or convention certificate (176 kB)PDF opens in a new window

Your family may be entitled to medical care

Your family members who do not work i your home country may also be entitled to medical care at the standard patient fee both in your home country and in Sweden when you work in Sweden. Contact the equivalent of Försäkringskassan in your home country to ensure your family members are entitled to care.

If you move to Sweden

If you are planning on staying in Sweden at least one year, you must generally be entered into the Swedish population register. This applies whether you are working or doing something else. You do this by registering with the Swedish Tax Agency. 

When you live in Sweden, you may be entitled to different types of compensation from Försäkringskassan, such as child allowance and housing allowance. You are also entitled to medical care and dental care under the same terms as other residents.

 

Frequently asked questions

Yes, you can undergo rehabilitation in the country where you live, even if you receive sickness benefit in the country where you work. Talk to your administrative officer to learn more.

The general rule is that you are insured for parental benefit and child allowance in the country where you work. So, if you work in Sweden you may be entitled to compensation from Försäkringskassan.