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Work in several countries within the EU/EEA or Switzerland

Here you can read about what applies if you work in several different EU/EEA countries or Switzerland. This information does not apply to people who are posted for a limited time period.

Work refers to all types of gainful employment, regardless of scope. When you work remotely, the work usually counts as being performed in the country where you are physically located, even if your employer or client is in another country.

If you are posted for a limited period, you can find information about posting on the Work within the EU/EEA or Switzerland page.

Work in the EU/EEA or Switzerland

Should I report to Försäkringskassan that I am working abroad?

Yes, if you live in Sweden and work in at least two different EU/EEA countries or Switzerland, you should report it to Försäkringskassan so that we can investigate which country's social insurance legislation you should be covered by. You can do this by applying for certificate A1.

You apply for certificate A1 by explaining your work situation on this form.

6220 Request for A1/E101 certificate or convention certificate (in Swedish)PDF

Remember to attach employment certificates for all of your employments. It should indicate how much you work for each employer or client in each country.

If you own your own business, you must also submit documents showing that your own company in Sweden is active.

If you are working as a flight or cabin crew you need to submit documents that show where you are stationed and which countries you fly to and from, such as employment contracts and work schedules.

 

You need to have certificate A1 when you work as an employee or self-employed person in more than one country within the EU/EEA or Switzerland. The certificate shows which country's social insurance legislation you are to be covered by. It is that country that you can receive compensation from and to that country that social security contributions are paid for you. You will receive the certificate from the social insurance office in the country whose legislation you are covered by. In Sweden it is Försäkringskassan. The certificate is valid until the date on the certificate or until the authority withdraws it.

You or your employer can present the certificate to the relevant institutions in the countries where you work to demonstrate that social security contributions are not to be paid for you there.

If you live in another EU/EEA country or Switzerland and work in at least two different EU/EEA countries or Switzerland, you should instead report it to the authority equivalent to Försäkringskassan in the country where you live. That authority will then investigate which country's social insurance legislation you are to be covered by.

What happens after I have reported this?

Once you have reported this to us, we will investigate which country's social insurance legislation you should be covered by. If we come to the conclusion that you are to be covered by

  • Swedish legislation we will send you a certificate A1. You present the certificate in the country where you are working so they know that you can receive compensation from Försäkringskassan and pay social security contributions in Sweden.
  • another country's legislation, we will contact the equivalent of Försäkringskassan there. You will then receive your certificate A1 from that country.

You cannot be covered by the social security legislation of two countries at the same time. The compensation you can receive and the social security contributions you or your employer should pay varies from country to country. Therefore, find out what applies in the country whose legislation you are covered by.

Your type of employment may affect which country's social insurance legislation you are covered by

Here you can read about which country's social insurance legislation applies to you when you work in different countries, based on the employment that you have.

 

You are covered by the legislation of the country where you live if you work in several EU/EEA countries or Switzerland and work at least 25% of your total working hours or receive a salary equivalent to at least 25% salary in the country that you live in.

You are covered by the legislation of the country where your employer has its registered office if you work less than 25% of your total working time or receive a salary equivalent to less than 25% in the country that you live in.

 

You are covered by the legislation of the country where you live if you work in several EU/EEA countries or Switzerland and work at least 25% of your total working hours or receive a salary equivalent to at least 25% salary in the country that you live in.

If you work less than 25% of your total working time or receive a salary equivalent to less than 25% in the country where you live, you are subject to the legislation of

  • the country where the employers have their registered office, if you have two or more employers established in the same country
  • the country you do not live in, if you have two or more employers established in two countries, one of which is the country where you live
  • the country where you live, if you have two or more employers who have are established in other countries.

 

If you are a public servant in a country within the EU/EEA or Switzerland, and have only one employer, you are covered by the legislation of the country where your employer is located regardless of where you do your work.

If you are a public servant in one country and work for a private employer in another country, you are subject to the legislation of the country where your public employer is located.

Who counts as a public servant?

Public servants is a term used in the EU/EEA and Switzerland when deciding which country's legislation a person is covered by. Each country decides who qualifies as a public servant in that country. In Sweden, those who work within the state, municipality or region are counted as public servants.

 

You are covered by the legislation of the country where you live if you work in several countries within the EU/EEA or Switzerland and work at least 25% in the country that you live in.

You are covered by the legislation of the country where your business has its main interest if you work less than 25% in the country where you live.

The calculation is based on turnover, working hours, number of services provided or income in each country. Where the business has its main interest is assessed on the basis of

  • where the fixed and permanent headquarters of the business is located
  • if the business is temporary or permanent
  • how many services your own company provides
  • which country's legislation the self-employed person would like to be covered by.

If you have your own limited company, you are counted as an employee of a private employer. Read more about what applies to you under the heading If you are employed by a private employer.

 

If you work as an employee in one country and as a self-employed person in another EU/EEA country or Switzerland, you are covered by the legislation of the country where you work as an employee.

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